Pray for Muamba

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Re: Pray for Muamba

Messaggio da leggereda Cooney » 28/04/2012, 15:52

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I only came to see Eboue!
Ye are come well - Ye are well come - Ye are welcome
http://archistadia.blogspot.it/

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Re: Pray for Muamba

Messaggio da leggereda ShearerTheLegend » 03/05/2012, 3:34


Link


Commovente.

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Re: Pray for Muamba

Messaggio da leggereda Cooney » 03/05/2012, 12:49

:love: :piange: :viva:
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I only came to see Eboue!
Ye are come well - Ye are well come - Ye are welcome
http://archistadia.blogspot.it/

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Re: Pray for Muamba

Messaggio da leggereda charlieVillans » 04/05/2012, 9:41

da pelle d'oca.....

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Re: Pray for Muamba

Messaggio da leggereda ShearerTheLegend » 05/05/2012, 12:59

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Toccante intervista a Muamba sulle pagine del Times

Spoiler:
Fabrice Muamba and fiancée reveal to Matt Dickinson that doctors trying to save him were twice preparing to admit defeat

“I died. Now I am alive.” There is disbelief in Fabrice Muamba’s soft voice as he sits in a hotel room and contemplates his status as a living, breathing miracle.

He knows he should not be here, sharing jokes with his fiancée, talking fondly about his young son, reflecting with wide-eyed wonder on the day that doctors twice discussed giving him up as dead during 78 minutes of resuscitation.

“This is a miracle, I am the living witness of a miracle,”
he says, pausing as if still overwhelmed by his staggering good fortune. “You don’t believe in miracles? Ask me, I will tell you how it is.”

But we can see the miracle right in front of us. It is wearing the world’s biggest smile.

This is the greatest feel-good story of them all. The tale of how a young, fit, much-loved man seemed on the brink of death in front of a live television audience. The days of prayer, support and clinging to the slimmest of hopes. Then, incredibly, the news that he might not only survive, but also defy every expectation of a tragically diminished life.

It is a modern miracle, celebrated with a wave of joy in a banqueting hall on Thursday night when Robin van Persie, there to be honoured as Footballer of the Year, rose from his seat and crossed the room to wrap his arms around his former Arsenal clubmate. A room choked with emotion.

All night people came up to greet Muamba, to touch the man who came back from the dead.

Today at Wembley Stadium, the Bolton Wanderers midfielder will be announced to the crowd as a guest at the FA Cup Final and that great bowl of humanity can celebrate with Muamba what it is to be alive. “I have been given a chance to live again,” he says. “It still blows my mind.”

As Muamba talks, slowly and deliberately, there are occasional repetitions. He is still piecing his memory back together and has been warned that it could take a year.

When Shauna, his fiancée, handed him his iPad recently, Muamba did not have a clue about his e-mail address or password. He writes lists of jobs to do because otherwise, he says, “it goes in one ear and out the other”.

“His memory is becoming selective,” Shauna interjects, with a playful gibe.

Muamba is due to start seeing a neuropsychologist once a week, but the road back is long. He is not allowed to drive for six months.

“I’ve still got a long way to go with the memory and it frustrates me,”
he says. “Obviously my brain is not as it used to be because there are things missing. My memory is literally all over the place. I will talk to Shauna, ask her about someone. Five minutes later I’ll ask the same question.”

He can walk around the house, the shops, but exercise is not to be contemplated while his body recovers from the trauma. “I went two weeks without weeing. My kidney wasn’t working, it wasn’t producing urine at all. My leg was swelling up, like huge. And my feet. I couldn’t believe it.

“When I went to wee the first time it was like Christmas. It was non-stop, it went on for ever. The doctors have told me, ‘Just shut down for the moment.’ I have to let my body recover.”

When Muamba talks at one point about playing football again, he quickly corrects himself. That discussion is months away. It is less than three weeks since he was released from hospital, less than two months since his cardiac arrest at White Hart Lane in the midst of an FA Cup quarter-final. He is still recovering from the physical trauma, his family from their own agonies.

Shauna was watching the match at home on television with three-year-old Joshua when Muamba collapsed. By the time she arrived in London on the train, he was in intensive care at the London Chest Hospital.

Only later would she discover — and only now does she reveal — that twice the doctors discussed whether there was anything more they could do.

“Seventy-eight minutes is a long time to try and revive anyone,” Shauna recalls. “It was only the personal connection between Dr [Jonathan] Tobin [the Bolton doctor] and Fabrice that kept them going. Dr Tobin told me that. Obviously, when you have personal relationship, if it’s your child or wife, then you’re going to pump a bit longer. They thought about stopping twice. Dr Tobin said, ‘No, let’s try again.’ ” And they kept on trying until they saved his life.

After more than an hour of compressions and mouth-to-mouth, Muamba’s heart began to beat on its own. But there was still an overwhelming sense of dread.

“When you are being manually resuscitated, you only get about 20 per cent of oxygen for the brain,” Shauna said. “So with the fact that he was down so long . . .

“They prepared me. They said, ‘Be prepared to have a severely brain-damaged person come out of it.’ They gave his dad the manual about how to cope with a brain-damaged person. He chucked it in the bin. He said he wouldn’t be needing it. His faith was so strong. He said Fabrice was going to be fine.”

No one else dared to think so. Tobin wept. Family and friends paced the corridor as Muamba lay unconscious for three days. Flowers were gathered around the country — wreaths, too.

But Muamba did wake up, slowly stirring from his deep sedation. First it was just the gentle squeeze of Shauna’s hand in recognition of her voice. Then Muamba began to speak.

“When I woke up I saw Shauna in this hospital dress,” he says. “All I remember thinking is, ‘What the f*** is going on here?’ She explained everything that happened. I couldn’t believe it. ‘Me? Really? Did I really die?’ ”

Some memories of hospital will never fade. Shauna speaks of a young African cleaner who would come into the room every day to pray silently in the corner. Muamba of waking up to find his family around the bed saying psalms for his recovery. “They were praying so loud,” he laughs. “No one could sleep through that.”

He remembers watching television in his drowsy state and being sure that he had seen the Pope say: “Pray for Muamba.” Turns out it was the Archbishop of Westminster. Either way, he is convinced that the prayers of millions helped to save him.

There were troubled moments, too. In his exhaustion, Muamba says, he became “very, very moody. People came to see me and I didn’t want to see them. I was telling people to get out of the room.” The medication? “Yeah,” he says. “Let’s blame that.”

Then there were the first, daunting steps. “It’s unbelievable, man, just to be able to walk freely with no machine, no wire in you. Just to be able to breathe. To be able to see my little boy and play with him. He’s a mini-me. The freedom, it’s priceless. I’ll hold on to that feeling for ever. There’s no money in the world that can buy that.”

Before he was sent home, Muamba was fitted with a defibrillator under his skin. “Do you want to feel it?” he asks, leaning over to allow a prod of the solid metal disc just above his heart. He has been told to regard it as his safety belt. “If I crash, it saves me.”

A Belgian professional footballer plays with one in his chest, although, unlike Muamba, Anthony van Loo had his heart condition diagnosed before he suffered any significant attack. There is extraordinary footage of him collapsing in one game and being instantly jolted back to life.

For Muamba, the reasons for his cardiac arrest remains mysterious. There have been scans, tests, examinations. Muamba is willing to endure as many as it takes, but there may never be a satisfactory answer to the question: “Why him? Why then?”

“It bothers me not to know,” he says. “I want to know. To be able to find the cause because if it happens to me, it can happen to anyone else.”

Muamba was deeply upset by the death of Piermario Morosini, the Livorno player, on a pitch only last month. Stunned again when Alexander Dale Oen, the Norwegian swimmer, collapsed in the shower last week while at a training camp for the Olympic Games.

“Three times in sports in the last few months? Unbelievable. There has to be a way of stopping this,” he says. “Morosini in Italy, that shocked me big time. I watched it on YouTube. It was mind-blowing. I said to myself, ‘This was me, not so long ago.’ The power of prayer and the knowledge of the doctors saved me. I was lucky.

“Trust me, I take every day as a blessing. They said I should be brain dead. I asked him, ‘Doc, tell me the truth.’ He told me, ‘Listen, I’m not going to lie, you should be brain-damaged. You should be dead. A month ago I thought you were finished.’ It still shocks me. I’m still recovering, still understanding what happened. I haven’t seen the video. I’ll watch it one day, but I’m not ready yet. It’s too much for me now.”

There is fragility in his movements but he grows stronger by the day, aided by the wonderful Shauna. Be glad that such good fortune has befallen a happy young couple with so much zest for life.

No WAG, Shauna runs her own catering business from home, making Caribbean food to order before hand-delivering it to clients near their Cheshire home. Muamba once took an Open University course in maths and business studies to complement his ten GCSEs, all A to C grades. “That was always my Plan B,” he says.

He has two years left on his contract at Bolton, but the club and his agents, Key Sports, who kept up their bedside vigil, say that their only concern is the best possible recovery. For now, Muamba is personally replying to the boxes of letters from wellwishers from all over the world; from strangers to stars such as LeBron James, a basketball idol who sent a signed jersey and message of goodwill.

Muamba will be following Bolton’s fight against relegation, as he did on Wednesday when he went back to the Reebok Stadium and, overcome by the warmth of the reception, cried on the pitch when he was presented to the crowd. “When I watched the game, my God I wished I was playing,” he says. “I just wanted to be out there. I miss football a lot. Watching, that’s hard.

“I love the game. It’s been great to me. When I came over from the Congo [in 1999, aged 11], I only spoke three words of English: ‘How are you?’ Football taught me the language, it gave me a chance.”

He went on to represent Arsenal in the Carling Cup “when they had great players — Patrick Vieira, Gilberto Silva, Edu. A big pond with big fish. I was a very little fish. I could get eaten.”

He played 33 times for England Under-21s. “I wanted to break into the England team. But if my circumstances won’t allow me to play football, I can say I gave everything. I’ve worked hard. We’ll see. There is a verse in the Bible, I can’t remember which one, but it goes: ‘If God is with us, who can be against us?’ If God is with me, who can be against me? I died, literally. I am alive. There is nothing now to be in fear of.”

It is an extraordinary tale, not just of a dead man walking but a couple who have been through so much, so young. On Valentine’s Day, they became engaged. A month later Muamba almost died. Now he and Shauna can plan together when they are going to be married.

What else? “I had a dream in the hospital that I won the lottery,” Muamba said. “And I can remember the numbers.” That’s pushing your luck, I suggest.

And the two lovebirds burst out laughing.

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Re: Pray for Muamba

Messaggio da leggereda Halfblood Bastard » 03/11/2012, 15:50

Stamane ospite a Football Focus. Bello vederlo sorridente e in salute parlare di football. È rimasto amico delle varie persone che lo hanno salvato e ogni volta non può che ringraziare chi lo ha supportato in quel difficile momento
«Gli italiani perdono le partite di calcio come se fossero guerre e perdono le guerre come se fossero partite di calcio.»
Winston Churchill


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Re: Pray for Muamba

Messaggio da leggereda Halfblood Bastard » 08/11/2012, 22:33

Fabrice è ospite insieme a Fowler e Strachan su ITV4, se ho capito bene scenderà sul prato per salutare i tifosi Spurs durante l'halftime del match di EL di stasera
«Gli italiani perdono le partite di calcio come se fossero guerre e perdono le guerre come se fossero partite di calcio.»
Winston Churchill


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Re: Pray for Muamba

Messaggio da leggereda Halfblood Bastard » 09/11/2012, 0:02

Grande, grande accoglienza per Muamba che risponde con gli occhi lucidi agli applausi degli Spurs fans :ave:
qui, dove il suo cuore si è fermato per 78 minuti
«Gli italiani perdono le partite di calcio come se fossero guerre e perdono le guerre come se fossero partite di calcio.»
Winston Churchill


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Re: Pray for Muamba

Messaggio da leggereda Toonarmy » 09/11/2012, 1:20

Halfblood Bastard ha scritto:Grande, grande accoglienza per Muamba che risponde con gli occhi lucidi agli applausi degli Spurs fans :ave:
qui, dove il suo cuore si è fermato per 78 minuti

Non so perchè sia andato a salutare i tifosi Spurs, ma è una cosa bellissima :ave: (altrove si insultano i morti...).
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Re: Pray for Muamba

Messaggio da leggereda ShearerTheLegend » 09/11/2012, 4:19



Torna a “Bolton”

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